Mission Zero

Mission Zero

Mission Zero offers students and young people the chance to have their computer programs run in space on the ISS! Teams write a simple program to display a message to the astronauts onboard. You don’t need special equipment or coding skills, and all participants that follow the rules are guaranteed to have their programs run in space. You will also receive a special certificate showing where exactly the ISS was when your program ran!

Who can take part?

  • Anyone who is 14 years or younger
  • In teams of two to four
  • Supervised by a teacher or mentor
  • Your team needs to be from either a primary or secondary school, Scout group or coding/after school club located in an ESA Member State, Slovenia, Canada or Malta. Certified home schools will also be accepted.
  • 50% of your team must be nationals of one of the participating countries mentioned above.You can find a list of ESA Member States here.

Official Mission Zero guidelines

How to take part:

  1. Teachers/mentors register for Mission Zero and receive a classroom code
  2. Students and young people follow along with the Mission Zero project to write their programs
  3. Students and young people use the classroom code to submit their programs

Teachers and mentors:

You need to register to receive a classroom code to give your team/s when they are ready to submit.

Register for Mission Zero

Students and young people:

Already have your classroom code?

Get started on Mission Zero

Languages

To help many more people take part in their native language this year, we have also translated the Mission Zero resource, guidelines, and website into 19 different languages!

Mission Zero Languages

Mission Space Lab

Mission Space Lab

Mission Space Lab offers students and young people the chance to have their scientific experiments run on the ISS. Your challenge is to design and program an experiment to be run on an Astro Pi computer. The best experiments will be deployed to the ISS, and your team will have the opportunity to analyse your results and put together a short report about your findings. The ten teams that write the best reports will be selected as the Astro Pi Mission Space Lab winners!

To take part in this year’s Challenge, you need to submit your team details and experiment idea by Friday 25th October.

Official Mission Space Lab guidelines

Who can take part?

    • Anyone who is 19 years or younger at the time of submission
    • In teams of two to six
    • Supervised by a teacher or mentor
    • Your team needs to be from either a primary or secondary school, Scout group or coding/after school club located in an ESA Member State, Slovenia, Canada or Malta. Certified home schools will also be accepted.
    • 50% of your team must be nationals of one of the participating countries mentioned above.You can find a list of ESA Member States here.

    Unsure where to start?

    Watch the video below to learn what you can and cannot do during your experiment, including hardware limitations. This will help you to establish what ideas will work in space and what ideas to avoid.

Submit your Phase 1 Idea

ESA Member States

1. Your team needs to be from either a primary or secondary school, Scout group or coding/after school club located in an ESA Member State, Slovenia, Canada or Malta. Certified home schools will also be accepted.

2. 50% of your team must be nationals of one of the participating countries mentioned above.

ESA MEMBER STATES IN 2019

  1. Austria
  2. Belgium
  3. Czech Republic
  4. Denmark
  5. Estonia
  6. Finland
  7. France
  8. Germany
  9. Greece
  10. Hungary
  11. Ireland
  12. Italy
  13. Luxembourg
  14. The Netherlands
  15. Norway
  16. Poland
  17. Portugal
  18. Romania
  19. Spain
  20. Sweden
  21. Switzerland
  22. United Kingdom

ESA will also accept entries from primary or secondary schools located outside an ESA Member State only if such schools are officially authorised and/or certified by the official Education authorities of an ESA Member State (for instance, French schools outside Europe officially recognised by the French Ministry of Education or delegated authority).

Mission Zero in your language

Mission Zero offers students and young people the chance to have their computer programs run in space on the ISS! Teams write a simple program to display a message to the astronauts onboard. You don’t need special equipment or coding skills, and all participants that follow the rules are guaranteed to have their programs run in space. You will also receive a special certificate showing where exactly the ISS was when your program ran!

We have translated the Mission Zero guidelines, resource and website into 18 different languages, to help many more people take part in their native language.

See the list below to take part in Mission Zero in your language:

English

Română

Polski

Ελληνικά

Čeština

Norsk

Français

Eesti keel

Suomi

Nederlands (NL/BE)

Dansk

Svenska

Italiano

Deutsch

Português

Magyar

Español

Slovenščina

Mission Space Lab

Mission Space Lab 2018 Submit Code Late

Mission Space Lab

Mission Space Lab 2018 Submit Code

Mission Space Lab phase 2 closed on 7 February 2018.

Please sign up to our newsletter to hear about next year’s challenge.

Mission Space Lab

Mission Space Lab 2018 Submit Idea

Registration for Mission Space Lab closed on 29 October 2017.

Please sign up to our newsletter to hear about next year’s challenge.

Mission Zero

Mission Zero 2018 Submission

 

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