Mission Zero in your language

Mission Zero

Mission Zero 2018/2019 has now closed for submissions. Sign up for our mailing list for updates about this and future missions!

Mission Zero offers students and young people the chance to have their computer programs run in space on the ISS! Teams write a simple program to display a message to the astronauts onboard. You don’t need special equipment or coding skills, and all participants that follow the rules are guaranteed to have their programs run in space. You will also receive a special certificate showing where exactly the ISS was when your program ran!

This year, we have translated the Mission Zero guidelines, resource and website into 19 different languages, to help many more people take part in their native language. See the list below to take part in Mission Zero in your language:

English

اللغة العربية

Română

Polski

Ελληνικά

Čeština

Norsk

Français

Eesti keel

Suomi

Nederlands

Dansk

Svenska

Italiano

Deutsch

Português

Vlaams

Magyar

Español

Slovenščina

 

Mission Space Lab

Mission Space Lab Submit Code Late

Mission Space Lab

Mission Space Lab Submit Code

Mission Space Lab phase 2 closed on 7 February 2018.

Please sign up to our newsletter to hear about next year’s challenge.

Mission Space Lab

Mission Space Lab Submit Idea

Registration for Mission Space Lab closed on 29 October 2017.

Please sign up to our newsletter to hear about next year’s challenge.

Mission Zero

Mission Zero Submission

 

.

Mission Zero

Mission Zero

Mission Zero offers students and young people the chance to have their computer programs run in space on the ISS! Teams write a simple program to display a message to the astronauts onboard. You don’t need special equipment or coding skills, and all participants that follow the rules are guaranteed to have their programs run in space. You will also receive a special certificate showing where exactly the ISS was when your program ran!

 

Who can take part?

  • Anyone who is 14 years or younger
  • In teams of two to four
  • Supervised by a teacher or mentor
  • 50% of teams’ members need to be citizens of an ESA Member/Associate Member State

 

How to take part:

  1. Teachers/mentors register for Mission Zero and receive a classroom code
  2. Students and young people follow along with the Mission Zero project to write their programs
  3. Students and young people use the classroom code to submit their programs

 

Teachers and mentors:

You need to register to receive a classroom code to give your team/s when they are ready to submit.

Register for Mission Zero

 

Students and young people:

Already have your classroom code?

Get started on Mission Zero

 

Official Mission Zero guidelines

 

Languages:

To help many more people take part in their native language this year, we have also translated the Mission Zero resource, guidelines, and website into 19 different languages!

Mission Zero Languages

 

Mission Space Lab

Mission Space Lab offers students and young people the chance to have their scientific experiments run on the ISS. Your challenge is to design and program an experiment to be run on an Astro Pi computer. The best experiments will be deployed to the ISS, and your team will have the opportunity to analyse your results and put together a short report about your findings. The ten teams that write the best reports will be selected as the Astro Pi Mission Space Lab winners!

Get started

Who can take part?

  • Anyone who is 19 years or younger at the time of submission
  • In teams of two to six
  • Supervised by a teacher or mentor
  • 50% of teams’ members need to be citizens of an ESA Member/Associate Member State